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11-26-20 06:49 PM
Xeogaming Forums - - Posts by Cteno
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Cteno

Super Shotgun
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Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 11-25-10 01:28 PM, in Thanksgiving plans? Link
I'm surrounded by my beloved family members.

HELP ME
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 11-25-10 08:29 PM, in HAPPY THANKS GIVING!!!! Link
Finally had dinner... nerves are shot from there being so many people and I want to lay down and cry for some reason. Good times.
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 11-27-10 02:04 PM, in Thanksgiving plans? Link
Originally posted by Hannelore the Great
Thanksgiving was great, aside from my family ganging up on me about my lack of a college education...

I hear you there... Going online is typically my only solace during such times, but unfortunately, mother forced me to set it up as a "family computer" in the living room when I moved back in... Good thing it's password protected! :smug:
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 11-28-10 01:42 AM, in Final Fantasy XIV Link
Alrighty, large bump. There were some glaring flaws during the launch, which were to be expected of course, but most of them were put to the grave with the latest update. No more UI lag, you're able to sort items, mobs drop a fixed amount of experience instead a random amount based on how many times you hit them, a noticeable framerate boost...

Yeah, that's the stuff. Now we just need to work on some juicy content, SquareEnix. Damn near all of the NPCs (outside of vendors, the guildleve counter and a certain few mission NPCs) have nearly no interaction whatsoever... How about some real quests? Perhaps with a content update in the future, I'm hoping.

Next month brings in Notorious Monsters, the big baddies that took finesse to fell in Final Fantasy XI, and new guildleves, among other changes and additions!

Stay tuned, Xeogaming.

Edit- Oh yeah, I rerolled as a Duskwight Elezen, though I really miss my Lalafell...


(Last edited by Lord Nelrith the Badass on 11-28-10 01:43 AM)
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 11-28-10 01:19 PM, in Final Fantasy XIV Link
As far as only gaining experience, yes, that limit is in place. However, you'll only hit it if you only play a single class and you play almost 24/7. I play 5 hours at a time and I haven't even come close to seeing this limit yet. It's pretty much there to stop bots and RMT, and I can see it working.
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 11-29-10 09:04 PM, in Olive Garden get's a returning manager that just DO NOT get along with Link
Originally posted by Rogue
I mean, you're not making Olive Garden management your career so why worry so much about it?

Because he has pride in what he does. This is nearly identical to the person who made me quit at TJ Maxx. I freaking loved working there but she was that one person who only had seniority because she had been there for 7 years (which she hung over everybody's head).

She was mad because I was a faster checker, counted money more accurately, and was overall more liked by the customers (even her "regulars")... Out of my complaints of her, she made fun of my stuttering and stole money out of the other employees' tills so they were all short at the end of the week.

Bitmap is proud of the work he does, just like me, but it takes just ONE douchebag to ruin everything. There's always one of these assbags in every job I find.
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 11-30-10 02:24 AM, in Olive Garden get's a returning manager that just DO NOT get along with Link
In the case of where I live, I've been job searching for 2 months now, so getting and keeping a job is a big deal. It was like that even before the economy took a hit!
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 11-30-10 01:48 PM, in The mask is coming off for a few.. Link
It's always better to get it all off your chest. I know how you're feeling, definitely, but you're definitely worse off and you seem to keep your head high most of the time.

I think I know now why I look up to you so much, you're able to hide it much better than I ever have been and still be yourself at the end of the day.

As far as bipolar people being shot, consider me and everybody on my dad's side of the family dead, hehe... The difference between my father and I, however, is that I admit to myself that I have these problems and I learn some damn coping skills. Hell, I wouldn't mind at all if my dad started taking meds like grandma Gypsy but he's just too damn stubborn!

And on to the love life portion... I've only been with two women in my entire life, both being very good to me. Regina was with me for 4 years and Kittie was with me for 4 days. Probably worse than the loneliness was the heartbreak of splitting up, seeing that they would rather post on Facebook how lonely they are, but it feels like, "I'd rather be lonely and miserable than be with you". A sexual relationship isn't hard to find in the slightest, I've had offers that I've turned down myself, but love is almost nonexistent where we live unfortunately. With me, love is the number one thing I hope to find so it really hurts badly.

If you ever need a friend to talk to, you know how to get a hold of me and you don't need to bribe me with food/alcohol to get me off my ass either!

PS- and sorry, I tried to give some kind of useful insight but I instead just started ranting about me... Oh well, it's already typed up...
Cteno

Super Shotgun
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Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-02-10 01:16 PM, in How the hell?! Link
I said "Happy birfday" on her Facebook...

But again, Happy birfday Elara!
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-03-10 12:56 PM, in Official Photo Album Thread Link
*reads the golf ball*

FFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU-
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-03-10 06:42 PM, in Cyber Weapon Cripples Iranian Nuclear Plant Link
Very interesting article...


In the 20th century, this would have been a job for James Bond.

The mission: Infiltrate the highly advanced, securely guarded enemy headquarters where scientists in the clutches of an evil master are secretly building a weapon that can destroy the world. Then render that weapon harmless and escape undetected.

But in the 21st century, Bond doesn't get the call. Instead, the job is handled by a suave and very sophisticated secret computer worm, a jumble of code called Stuxnet, which in the last year has not only crippled Iran's nuclear program but has caused a major rethinking of computer security around the globe.

Intelligence agencies, computer security companies and the nuclear industry have been trying to analyze the worm since it was discovered in June by a Belarus-based company that was doing business in Iran. And what they've all found, says Sean McGurk, the Homeland Security Department's acting director of national cyber security and communications integration, is a “game changer.”

The construction of the worm was so advanced, it was “like the arrival of an F-35 into a World War I battlefield,” says Ralph Langner, the computer expert who was the first to sound the alarm about Stuxnet. Others have called it the first “weaponized” computer virus.

Simply put, Stuxnet is an incredibly advanced, undetectable computer worm that took years to construct and was designed to jump from computer to computer until it found the specific, protected control system that it aimed to destroy: Iran’s nuclear enrichment program.

The target was seemingly impenetrable; for security reasons, it lay several stories underground and was not connected to the World Wide Web. And that meant Stuxnet had to act as sort of a computer cruise missile: As it made its passage through a set of unconnected computers, it had to grow and adapt to security measures and other changes until it reached one that could bring it into the nuclear facility.

When it ultimately found its target, it would have to secretly manipulate it until it was so compromised it ceased normal functions.

And finally, after the job was done, the worm would have to destroy itself without leaving a trace.

That is what we are learning happened at Iran's nuclear facilities -- both at Natanz, which houses the centrifuge arrays used for processing uranium into nuclear fuel, and, to a lesser extent, at Bushehr, Iran's nuclear power plant.

At Natanz, for almost 17 months, Stuxnet quietly worked its way into the system and targeted a specific component -- the frequency converters made by the German equipment manufacturer Siemens that regulated the speed of the spinning centrifuges used to create nuclear fuel. The worm then took control of the speed at which the centrifuges spun, making them turn so fast in a quick burst that they would be damaged but not destroyed. And at the same time, the worm masked that change in speed from being discovered at the centrifuges' control panel.

At Bushehr, meanwhile, a second secret set of codes, which Langner called “digital warheads,” targeted the Russian-built power plant's massive steam turbine.

Here's how it worked, according to experts who have examined the worm:
--The nuclear facility in Iran runs an “air gap” security system, meaning it has no connections to the Web, making it secure from outside penetration. Stuxnet was designed and sent into the area around Iran's Natanz nuclear power plant -- just how may never be known -- to infect a number of computers on the assumption that someone working in the plant would take work home on a flash drive, acquire the worm and then bring it back to the plant.

--Once the worm was inside the plant, the next step was to get the computer system there to trust it and allow it into the system. That was accomplished because the worm contained a “digital certificate” stolen from JMicron, a large company in an industrial park in Taiwan. (When the worm was later discovered it quickly replaced the original digital certificate with another certificate, also stolen from another company, Realtek, a few doors down in the same industrial park in Taiwan.)

--Once allowed entry, the worm contained four “Zero Day” elements in its first target, the Windows 7 operating system that controlled the overall operation of the plant. Zero Day elements are rare and extremely valuable vulnerabilities in a computer system that can be exploited only once. Two of the vulnerabilities were known, but the other two had never been discovered. Experts say no hacker would waste Zero Days in that manner.

--After penetrating the Windows 7 operating system, the code then targeted the “frequency converters” that ran the centrifuges. To do that it used specifications from the manufacturers of the converters. One was Vacon, a Finnish Company, and the other Fararo Paya, an Iranian company. What surprises experts at this step is that the Iranian company was so secret that not even the IAEA knew about it.

--The worm also knew that the complex control system that ran the centrifuges was built by Siemens, the German manufacturer, and -- remarkably -- how that system worked as well and how to mask its activities from it.

--Masking itself from the plant's security and other systems, the worm then ordered the centrifuges to rotate extremely fast, and then to slow down precipitously. This damaged the converter, the centrifuges and the bearings, and it corrupted the uranium in the tubes. It also left Iranian nuclear engineers wondering what was wrong, as computer checks showed no malfunctions in the operating system.

Estimates are that this went on for more than a year, leaving the Iranian program in chaos. And as it did, the worm grew and adapted throughout the system. As new worms entered the system, they would meet and adapt and become increasingly sophisticated.

During this time the worms reported back to two servers that had to be run by intelligence agencies, one in Denmark and one in Malaysia. The servers monitored the worms and were shut down once the worm had infiltrated Natanz. Efforts to find those servers since then have yielded no results.
This went on until June of last year, when a Belarusan company working on the Iranian power plant in Beshehr discovered it in one of its machines. It quickly put out a notice on a Web network monitored by computer security experts around the world. Ordinarily these experts would immediately begin tracing the worm and dissecting it, looking for clues about its origin and other details.

But that didn’t happen, because within minutes all the alert sites came under attack and were inoperative for 24 hours.

“I had to use e-mail to send notices but I couldn’t reach everyone. Whoever made the worm had a full day to eliminate all traces of the worm that might lead us them,” Eric Byres, a computer security expert who has examined the Stuxnet. “No hacker could have done that.”

Experts, including inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency, say that, despite Iran's claims to the contrary, the worm was successful in its goal: causing confusion among Iran’s nuclear engineers and disabling their nuclear program.

Because of the secrecy surrounding the Iranian program, no one can be certain of the full extent of the damage. But sources inside Iran and elsewhere say that the Iranian centrifuge program has been operating far below its capacity and that the uranium enrichment program had “stagnated” during the time the worm penetrated the underground facility. Only 4,000 of the 9,000 centrifuges Iran was known to have were put into use. Some suspect that is because of the critical need to replace ones that were damaged.

And the limited number of those in use dwindled to an estimated 3,700 as problems engulfed their operation. IAEA inspectors say the sabotage better explains the slowness of the program, which they had earlier attributed to poor equipment manufacturing and management problems. As Iranians struggled with the setbacks, they began searching for signs of sabotage. From inside Iran there have been unconfirmed reports that the head of the plant was fired shortly after the worm wended its way into the system and began creating technical problems, and that some scientists who were suspected of espionage disappeared or were executed. And counter intelligence agents began monitoring all communications between scientists at the site, creating a climate of fear and paranoia.

Iran has adamantly stated that its nuclear program has not been hit by the bug. But in doing so it has backhandedly confirmed that its nuclear facilities were compromised. When Hamid Alipour, head of the nation’s Information Technology Company, announced in September that 30,000 Iranian computers had been hit by the worm but the nuclear facilities were safe, he added that among those hit were the personal computers of the scientists at the nuclear facilities. Experts say that Natanz and Bushehr could not have escaped the worm if it was in their engineers’ computers.

“We brought it into our lab to study it and even with precautions it spread everywhere at incredible speed,” Byres said.
“The worm was designed not to destroy the plants but to make them ineffective. By changing the rotation speeds, the bearings quickly wear out and the equipment has to be replaced and repaired. The speed changes also impact the quality of the uranium processed in the centrifuges creating technical problems that make the plant ineffective,” he explained.

In other words the worm was designed to allow the Iranian program to continue but never succeed, and never to know why.

One additional impact that can be attributed to the worm, according to David Albright of the Institute for Science and International Studies, is that “the lives of the scientists working in the facility have become a living hell because of counter-intelligence agents brought into the plant” to battle the breach. Ironically, even after its discovery, the worm has succeeded in slowing down Iran's reputed effort to build an atomic weapon. And Langer says that the efforts by the Iranians to cleanse Stuxnet from their system “will probably take another year to complete,” and during that time the plant will not be able to function anywhere normally.
But as the extent of the worm’s capabilities is being understood, its genius and complexity has created another perplexing question: Who did it?

Speculation on the worm’s origin initially focused on hackers or even companies trying to disrupt competitors. But as engineers tore apart the virus they learned not only the depth of the code, its complex targeting mechanism, (despite infecting more than 100,000 computers it has only done damage at Natanz,) the enormous amount of work that went into it—Microsoft estimated that it consumed 10,000 man days of labor-- and about what the worm knew, the clues narrowed the number of players that have the capabilities to create it to a handful.
“This is what nation-states build, if their only other option would be to go to war,” Joseph Wouk, an Israeli security expert wrote.
Byers is more certain. “It is a military weapon,” he said.

And much of what the worm “knew” could only have come from a consortium of Western intelligence agencies, experts who have examined the code now believe.

Originally, all eyes turned toward Israel’s intelligence agencies. Engineers examining the worm found “clues” that hinted at Israel’s involvement. In one case they found the word “Myrtus” embedded in the code and argued that it was a reference to Esther, the biblical figure who saved the ancient Jewish state from the Persians. But computer experts say "Myrtus" is more likely a common reference to “My RTUS,” or remote terminal units.

Langer argues that no single Western intelligence agency had the skills to pull this off alone. The most likely answer, he says, is that a consortium of intelligence agencies worked together to build the cyber bomb. And he says the most likely confederates are the United States, because it has the technical skills to make the virus, Germany, because reverse-engineering Siemen’s product would have taken years without it, and Russia, because of its familiarity with both the Iranian nuclear plant and Siemen’s systems.

There is one clue that was left in the code that may tell us all we need to know.

Embedded in different section of the code is another common computer language reference, but this one is misspelled. Instead of saying “DEADFOOT,” a term stolen from pilots meaning a failed engine, this one reads “DEADFOO7.”

Yes, OO7 has returned -- as a computer worm.

Stuxnet. Shaken, not stirred.

Thoughts on this? That's probably the most interesting thing I've read all year!
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-04-10 10:37 AM, in Olive Garden get's a returning manager that just DO NOT get along with Link
Oh my... so being a member of the lodge has outside-of-the-box advantages!

Very well played, sir!
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-04-10 10:51 AM, in Children Discipline Link
When a child makes a mistake, it's good to be a loving and understanding parent and explain why what they did was wrong, otherwise they won't learn.

If they deliberately do something naughty then I personally believe that a sore behind is a good way to teach them not to do it again.

A lot of parents don't understand the difference between accidentally knocking over the vase and throwing it against the wall. Too many would punish exactly the same in either situation.

Another thing that bugs me is when a child isn't doing anything wrong but is talking up a storm (like a 2 year old babbling/talking or whatnot) and the parent threatens multiple times in 30 minutes with a spanking... Not the kind of thing to punish for. You're an adult, deal with it.

Even worse is when parents constantly threaten with spankings but never do anything. That teaches the child that threats mean nothing and they end up walking all over the parent and other people later in life. Or better yet, the "wait until your father gets home" routine. Oh sure, put it all on the other parent! This is also very terrifying for children, not knowing when the other adult will return from work or wherever.
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-05-10 03:09 AM, in Children Discipline Link
Originally posted by Bitmap
Hell standing in a corner for two hours was torture enough for me.

I remember standing in the corner for 15 minutes felt like two hours when I was little!
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-05-10 03:20 PM, in Almighty Metal Thread \m/ Link
Star One

Space Metal

FUCK YEAH!


I would have posted the studio album instead for better sound quality, but I like the sound of the backup vocalists in the live version more...


(Last edited by Lord Nelrith the Badass on 12-05-10 03:21 PM)
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-06-10 04:23 AM, in My first tattoo! Link
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-06-10 12:58 PM, in Changing your Facebook photo to a cartoon Link
Originally posted by Elara
*shrug*

I just like changing my picture to Daria.

Wait, that's not you?

I changed my picture to one of Beetlejuice and Lydia. Then when somebody mentioned something about paedophilia, I felt really bad... especially when I said "So, can I watch your kids?" after I thought she was joking. Ironically, I'm actually watching her son today.

I refuse to change my pic simply out of principle, but I've been sorely tempted.
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-06-10 04:44 PM, in My first tattoo! Link
Speaking of cryptic videogame tattoos, the first one I want to get is the Symbol of Torment from Planescape: Torment on my left shoulder.

Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-07-10 03:39 AM, in WBC puts a veteran with no legs in Jail. Murder conspiracy. Link

Geoff Maddox, 29, Long Beach’s Hate Crime Awareness founder, insisted the counter-protesters turn their backs on the WBC members. Many did so while displaying middle fingers.

Wait, Drizzt isn't 29!
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 384 days
Last activity: 361 days
Posted on 12-07-10 01:57 PM, in WBC puts a veteran with no legs in Jail. Murder conspiracy. Link
Don't you love hypocrisy? These people feel more empowered when they tell everybody else that they're wrong when these people are just as flawed, if not more so. It sickens me.
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Xeogaming Forums - - Posts by Cteno



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