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Xeogaming Forums - General Chat - The English don't like our "Americanisms" | |
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Rogue
If you're reading this... You are the Resistance











Since: 08-17-04

Since last post: 2 days
Last activity: 2 days
Posted on 07-21-11 12:00 AM Link | Quote
SOURCE

While many of the e-mailed complaints of how Americans speak English come from all over, the notion having people send in Americanisms they hate originated in the UK.

Originally posted by BBC
Americanisms: 50 of your most noted examples

The Magazine's recent piece on Americanisms entering the language in the UK prompted thousands of you to e-mail examples.

Some are useful, while some seem truly unnecessary, argued Matthew Engel in the article. Here are 50 of the most e-mailed.

1. When people ask for something, I often hear: "Can I get a..." It infuriates me. It's not New York. It's not the 90s. You're not in Central Perk with the rest of the Friends. Really." Steve, Rossendale, Lancashire

2. The next time someone tells you something is the "least worst option", tell them that their most best option is learning grammar. Mike Ayres, Bodmin, Cornwall

3. The phrase I've watched seep into the language (especially with broadcasters) is "two-time" and "three-time". Have the words double, triple etc, been totally lost? Grammatically it makes no sense, and is even worse when spoken. My pulse rises every time I hear or see it. Which is not healthy as it's almost every day now. Argh! D Rochelle, Bath

4. Using 24/7 rather than "24 hours, 7 days a week" or even just plain "all day, every day". Simon Ball, Worcester

5. The one I can't stand is "deplane", meaning to disembark an aircraft, used in the phrase "you will be able to deplane momentarily". TykeIntheHague, Den Haag, Holland

6. To "wait on" instead of "wait for" when you're not a waiter - once read a friend's comment about being in a station waiting on a train. For him, the train had yet to arrive - I would have thought rather that it had got stuck at the station with the friend on board. T Balinski, Raglan, New Zealand

7. "It is what it is". Pity us. Michael Knapp, Chicago, US

8. Dare I even mention the fanny pack? Lisa, Red Deer, Canada

9. "Touch base" - it makes me cringe no end. Chris, UK

10. Is "physicality" a real word? Curtis, US

11. Transportation. What's wrong with transport? Greg Porter, Hercules, CA, US

12. The word I hate to hear is "leverage". Pronounced lev-er-ig rather than lee-ver -ig. It seems to pop up in all aspects of work. And its meaning seems to have changed to "value added". Gareth Wilkins, Leicester

13. Does nobody celebrate a birthday anymore, must we all "turn" 12 or 21 or 40? Even the Duke of Edinburgh was universally described as "turning" 90 last month. When did this begin? I quite like the phrase in itself, but it seems to have obliterated all other ways of speaking about birthdays. Michael McAndrew, Swindon

14. I caught myself saying "shopping cart" instead of shopping trolley today and was thoroughly disgusted with myself. I've never lived nor been to the US either. Graham Nicholson, Glasgow

15. What kind of word is "gotten"? It makes me shudder. Julie Marrs, Warrington

16. "I'm good" for "I'm well". That'll do for a start. Mike, Bridgend, Wales

17. "Bangs" for a fringe of the hair. Philip Hall, Nottingham

18. Take-out rather than takeaway! Simon Ball, Worcester

19. I enjoy Americanisms. I suspect even some Americans use them in a tongue-in-cheek manner? "That statement was the height of ridiculosity". Bob, Edinburgh

20. "A half hour" instead of "half an hour". EJB, Devon

21. A "heads up". For example, as in a business meeting. Lets do a "heads up" on this issue. I have never been sure of the meaning. R Haworth, Marlborough

22. Train station. My teeth are on edge every time I hear it. Who started it? Have they been punished? Chris Capewell, Queens Park, London

23. To put a list into alphabetical order is to "alphabetize it" - horrid! Chris Fackrell, York

24. People that say "my bad" after a mistake. I don't know how anything could be as annoying or lazy as that. Simon Williamson, Lymington, Hampshire

25. "Normalcy" instead of "normality" really irritates me. Tom Gabbutt, Huddersfield

26. As an expat living in New Orleans, it is a very long list but "burglarize" is currently the word that I most dislike. Simon, New Orleans

27. "Oftentimes" just makes me shiver with annoyance. Fortunately I've not noticed it over here yet. John, London

28. Eaterie. To use a prevalent phrase, oh my gaad! Alastair, Maidstone (now in Athens, Ohio)

29. I'm a Brit living in New York. The one that always gets me is the American need to use the word bi-weekly when fortnightly would suffice just fine. Ami Grewal, New York

30. I hate "alternate" for "alternative". I don't like this as they are two distinct words, both have distinct meanings and it's useful to have both. Using alternate for alternative deprives us of a word. Catherine, London

31. "Hike" a price. Does that mean people who do that are hikers? No, hikers are ramblers! M Holloway, Accrington

32. Going forward? If I do I shall collide with my keyboard. Ric Allen, Matlock

33. I hate the word "deliverable". Used by management consultants for something that they will "deliver" instead of a report. Joseph Wall, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire

34. The most annoying Americanism is "a million and a half" when it is clearly one and a half million! A million and a half is 1,000,000.5 where one and a half million is 1,500,000. Gordon Brown, Coventry

35. "Reach out to" when the correct word is "ask". For example: "I will reach out to Kevin and let you know if that timing is convenient". Reach out? Is Kevin stuck in quicksand? Is he teetering on the edge of a cliff? Can't we just ask him? Nerina, London

36. Surely the most irritating is: "You do the Math." Math? It's MATHS. Michael Zealey, London

37. I hate the fact I now have to order a "regular Americano". What ever happened to a medium sized coffee? Marcus Edwards, Hurst Green

38. My worst horror is expiration, as in "expiration date". Whatever happened to expiry? Christina Vakomies, London

39. My favourite one was where Americans claimed their family were "Scotch-Irish". This of course it totally inaccurate, as even if it were possible, it would be "Scots" not "Scotch", which as I pointed out is a drink. James, Somerset

40.I am increasingly hearing the phrase "that'll learn you" - when the English (and more correct) version was always "that'll teach you". What a ridiculous phrase! Tabitha, London

41. I really hate the phrase: "Where's it at?" This is not more efficient or informative than "where is it?" It just sounds grotesque and is immensely irritating. Adam, London

42. Period instead of full stop. Stuart Oliver, Sunderland

43. My pet hate is "winningest", used in the context "Michael Schumacher is the winningest driver of all time". I can feel the rage rising even using it here. Gayle, Nottingham

44. My brother now uses the term "season" for a TV series. Hideous. D Henderson, Edinburgh

45. Having an "issue" instead of a "problem". John, Leicester

46. I hear more and more people pronouncing the letter Z as "zee". Not happy about it! Ross, London

47. To "medal" instead of to win a medal. Sets my teeth on edge with a vengeance. Helen, Martock, Somerset

48. "I got it for free" is a pet hate. You got it "free" not "for free". You don't get something cheap and say you got it "for cheap" do you? Mark Jones, Plymouth

49. "Turn that off already". Oh dear. Darren, Munich

50. "I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less" has to be the worst. Opposite meaning of what they're trying to say. Jonathan, Birmingham


It's amusing how much makes people cringe, shiver, shudder, or shit their pants (or trousers, since many English HATE Americans saying "pants") in disgust. I mean, some of this is simply a difference in lingo -- "math" vs. "maths," say.
Xeoman

Ball and Chain Trooper
Administrator








Since: 08-14-04
From: 255

Since last post: 75 days
Last activity: 11 days
Posted on 07-21-11 01:04 AM Link | Quote
Yeah, this stuff is seriously pretty funny. Wow...
Belial

Bazu








Since: 01-29-05
From: New Zealand

Since last post: 2914 days
Last activity: 2528 days
Posted on 07-21-11 01:06 AM Link | Quote
I have a British friend who JUST linked me to this.. I lol'd. He cringed when I told him I actually use most of these.. haha
Bitmap

#1 Enhancement Shaman US Ravenholdt








Since: 09-05-04
From: His Laughin' Place

Since last post: 3106 days
Last activity: 3100 days
Posted on 07-21-11 01:08 AM Link | Quote
Im gonna debate this with my tea and crumpits
Astrophel
Fear will kill your mind and steal your love as sure as anything;
Fear will rob you blind and make you numb to others suffering









Since: 10-03-04
From: Azul Lux Orbital, Kirin Beta

Since last post: 1029 days
Last activity: 377 days
Posted on 07-21-11 01:12 AM Link | Quote
Oh no. They don't like how we talk. Whatever will we do.


oh right continue to not give a damn
Rogue
If you're reading this... You are the Resistance











Since: 08-17-04

Since last post: 2 days
Last activity: 2 days
Posted on 07-21-11 01:37 AM Link | Quote
Originally posted by Astrophel
Oh no. They don't like how we talk. Whatever will we do.


oh right continue to not give a damn


Man, you are on fire with the comments these days, Thex.


Oh no, I said "shopping cart." I need to head home for some self-flagellation... I've been baaaaad.
Twilight Sparkle









Since: 06-01-11
From: Equestria

Since last post: 3316 days
Last activity: 2980 days
Posted on 07-21-11 01:43 AM Link | Quote
I think it's funny when an American tries correctly a British person's spelling.

British: ...Realise....

American: It's "realize," idiot.

British: I'm English. From England. You know, where the English language originated from? It's "Realise."

Of course, I found it humiliating when my British friend with the super pretty accent told me my voice sounded "Backwoods." >.>
Elara

Divine Mamkute
Dark Elf Goddess
Chaos Imp
Penguins Fan

Ms. Invisable








Since: 08-15-04
From: Ferelden

Since last post: 273 days
Last activity: 273 days
Posted on 07-21-11 02:15 AM Link | Quote
Considering that half of the regional British accents are completely unintelligible , I really wouldn't take too much offense to it.

I mean, a lot of these things on the list are petty.

Regular Americano is a product of Starbucks, blame them, not the country. My bad originated in eubonics. What is wrong with Train Station?!

Do the maths? That sounds wrong and it seems they don't actually get the meaning.

Things like "heads up on the issue" I have never heard of or heard anyone say. Has anyone ever heard the term "deplane"?

Honestly to me it is like people who spoke Elizabethan English bitching about modern British English. A lot of the changes in American English from British English were made on purpose to separate ourselves from Britain after the Revolution... it's why we write color instead of colour and say zee instead of zed.

Also, where is the lists bitching about Canadian and Australian English?
Rogue
If you're reading this... You are the Resistance











Since: 08-17-04

Since last post: 2 days
Last activity: 2 days
Posted on 07-21-11 02:28 AM Link | Quote
Originally posted by Elara
Honestly to me it is like people who spoke Elizabethan English bitching about modern British English. A lot of the changes in American English from British English were made on purpose to separate ourselves from Britain after the Revolution... it's why we write color instead of colour and say zee instead of zed.

My thoughts exactly. We were also trying to get rid of unnecessary letters when creating our own dictionaries in the post-Revolution America. Ain't history neat?

Also, English is a Germanic language and not an entirely original language conceived in Brittania.

Also, I have heard the word "deplane," but only used by flight attendants and airport employees.



(Last edited by Rogue on 07-21-11 01:40 PM)
Elara

Divine Mamkute
Dark Elf Goddess
Chaos Imp
Penguins Fan

Ms. Invisable








Since: 08-15-04
From: Ferelden

Since last post: 273 days
Last activity: 273 days
Posted on 07-21-11 01:12 PM Link | Quote
I've only heard "disembark" when I was on a plane. Maybe it's a newer thing?
Rogue
If you're reading this... You are the Resistance











Since: 08-17-04

Since last post: 2 days
Last activity: 2 days
Posted on 07-21-11 01:48 PM Link | Quote
Ack, I suddenly noticed a typo in my last post. That should have read English is NOT an entirely original language conceived in Brittania.


Yeah, I think they started using "deplane" referring to unloading passengers. "Unloading" sounds like people are cargo, and "disembark" sounds like the plane is departing. I don't think it's the official lingo, but rather something that's just sort of spread in that industry.

I dunno. Language is an ever shifting, ever evolving (perhaps even devolving) thing. I mean, the Oxford English Dictionary, which originates in England, keeps including words (and even symbols and acronyms) that the rest of us are somewhat confused about regarding their inclusion.
Bitmap

#1 Enhancement Shaman US Ravenholdt








Since: 09-05-04
From: His Laughin' Place

Since last post: 3106 days
Last activity: 3100 days
Posted on 07-21-11 04:35 PM Link | Quote
T-minus ten posts before Americans make a list to "Comeback" at that article.
Cteno

Super Shotgun
Moderator








Since: 01-11-05

Since last post: 390 days
Last activity: 366 days
Posted on 07-21-11 06:41 PM Link | Quote
In before more bitching about slang.
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