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01-27-21 01:57 AM
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Xeogaming Forums - Debate Shrine - Internet Anonymity | |
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Kyoku kun

Phan Phan
Where in the world in Aurora the Explora? Currently California!








Since: 06-19-06
From: Northern California

Since last post: 3374 days
Last activity: 3002 days
Posted on 07-24-08 02:38 AM Link | Quote
What do you all think about internet anonymity..?

I like the idea of being able to post whatever you want without people knowing who you are, but it also lets people like the guys that troll myspace pages driving kids to suicide get off without any consequences....

Discusss?










Since: 12-31-69

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Posted on 07-24-08 02:40 AM Link | Quote
I wrote an Academic Essay on this topic, last year, for my English 1A class at my college.



Your Right to Remain Anonymous and How that Influences Freedom of Speech

Anonymity and privacy are synonymous with each other. The right to keep your name and identity private is the purest form of privacy there is. Many of our founding fathers chose to speak anonymously. “Common Sense” was signed simply as “an Englishman”, along with several other great works. Judith S. Donath, an associates professor at MIT writes, “In communication, which is the primary activity, knowing the identity of those with whom you communicate is essential for understanding and evaluating an interaction. Yet in the disembodied world of the virtual community, identity is also ambiguous. Many of the basic cues about personality and social roles we are accustomed to in the physical world are absent” (n. pag). Anonymity in its many forms allows people to act without fear of any repercussions for their actions, permitting them to do and say things that they’d normally be afraid to do, such as blowing the whistle on a violent crime, but that lack of fear also opens the gates to a lot of negative speech, as people feel less accountable for their own words and actions.

There are a lot of positive aspects to anonymity. Keeping your name private from public eyes allows you to get around several situations that a name might normally place you in. Michael Froomkin, a professor of law says, “Basically, anything you can do with words and pictures, you can do anonymously on the Internet by routing your messages through an anonymous remailer. While limited in its scope, this communicative anonymity allows users to engage in political speech without fear of retribution, to engage in whistle-blowing while running a greatly reduced risk of detection, and to seek advice about embarrassing personal problems without fear of discovery-something that is hard to do by telephone in this age of caller ID” (Froomkin). You may also use your anonymity to get away from an already bad reputation with certain groups of people. Jacob Palme of the Department of Computer and Systems Sciences at Stockholm University and KTH writes, “A well-known person may use a pseudonym to write messages, where the person does not want people's preconception of the real author color their perception of the message” (n. pag) For example, a Republican writer who is widely disliked by democratic readers might write an article under a pseudonym to appeal to and persuade democratic readers, avoiding their prejudice. Writers with a less than reputable history can also write their opinions anonymously to be taken seriously, the same way.

Anonymity can also be used to allow users to ask controversial questions on an anonymous question and answer site, such as Yahoo Answers, without worry that their peers might wonder why they wanted to ask such a question. Anonymous question and answer services work the same way the question box worked in sexual education class, letting the students avoid humiliation when asking a question. In the same way, other anonymous users may answer the question the user posted, without worry that their peers might wonder why they know about something potentially embarrassing. The most commonly used site of this kind would be the WikiAnswers section of Wikipedia. Wikipedia is an online, free Encyclopedia where any Internet user that visits the site may make or edit whatever page they find on Wikipedia, with some exceptions, such as staff pages. Since anybody can post whatever they want on Wikipedia, the credibility of the site is constantly disputed. However, the about page on Wikipedia explains that “About 75,000 editors — from expert scholars to casual readers — regularly edit Wikipedia, and these experienced editors often help to create a consistent style throughout the encyclopedia, following our Model of Style” (Wikipedia). This shows that individual articles on Wikipedia are constantly tested by rigorous peer review. As many articles go fundamentally unchanged for long periods of time, despite a large number of page views every day, it would be hard to argue that Wikipedia doesn't undergo constant peer review. Wikipedia, and sites like it, are also a great place to find information on newer topics that may not be considered “news” by conventional newsgroups.

Working off the same point of avoiding shame, quite a few Internet users use online confession forums to anonymously confess secrets to the masses. Online confessions are very popular, with almost a trillion confessions on sites like Grouphug.us. There are a few drawbacks to online confessional sites, however. Anne Machalinski, reporter for the student paper, “The Columbia News Source” reports that, “While online traffic to confessional sites thrives, the Catholic Church is fighting to get parishioners to embrace the traditional sacrament of penance, which provides absolution to those who ask for forgiveness” (n. pag). Since the creation of online confessional sites, the number of Catholic Church confessional sessions has dropped dramatically. Machalinski goes on to say, “Confession was traditionally a regular part of Catholic life. But now, the Rev. Joseph Fonti, a Catholic priest in Brooklyn who hears confession every Monday and Saturday and by appointment, says he spends most of that time alone” (n. pag). Archdiocese spokeswoman Susan Gibbs told the post, "People go online and confess all sorts of things, but they don't do it in a way of apology. And it's very hard to verbalize what you did wrong" (qtd. in D.C.). The appeal to online confessional sites is clear. You avoid the stigma of going out to see a therapist, or talking to a Priest. On an online confessional site, thousands of other people are confessing their secrets alongside your own. Thania Cadet, who holds a master’s degree in clinical psychology and practices in Chicago, says that “It is within human nature to compare yourself to others. It’s a rationalization technique, but it also makes people feel better” (qtd. in Machalinski).

Internet users in other parts of the world, where freedom of speech is not a protected right, are also able to hide behind anonymity to speak their mind without worry. Jonathan Wallace wrote, in a Cato Briefing paper, “Around the world, many governments refuse to protect their citizens’ basic rights, including the right of free speech. Anonymous Internet communications may be the only way to ensure those regimes’ accountability” (5-6) Workers for a company are able to vent their frustration about their job, or their coworkers without fear of retaliation. Most companies have employee based message boards to allow their workers to talk to each other. Unfortunately, quite a few workers are anonymously saying things they wouldn't normally dare say in public. Reed Abelson of The New York Times reports that “All this makes for enormous challenges in the new electronic communities. It can be useful for managers to find out what their employees really think of them, but also devastating when hurtful and hateful gossip is laid out for all to see” (n. pag). Far too many users use their anonymity as a shield to post defamatory libelous comments about individuals, without fear of retaliation, legal or otherwise.

There are a lot of negative aspects to anonymity as well, especially on the internet. It’s common knowledge that almost every social network on the internet has to deal with Trolls. PC Magazine defines a troll as someone who posts derogatory messages about sensitive subjects on newsgroups and chat rooms to bait users into responding (n. pag). Internet trolling is more commonly used as a catch all term to describe anybody on the Internet that speaks in an offensive or insulting manner to other users, in order elicit an emotional, usually negative response. Trolls will often say racist, or sexist things, to rile up other users, in the same way a schoolyard bully might taunt a classmate. Susan Herring, a professor at Indiana University writes, “When women gather online, and especially when they attempt to discuss feminism, they are not uncommonly the target of negative attention from individuals, mostly men, who feel threatened by or otherwise uncomfortable with feminism” (n. pag.). Trolling is a serious problem on almost every forum where they go, and anonymity is one of the main factors of the problem. David Davenport of Opposing Viewpoints says, “In circumstances where people can be largely anonymous, and the threat of punishment is thus minimal, they find it easier to justify to themselves actions against those they perceive as outsiders or enemies” (n. pag). Trolls often times will drive people away from social networking sites all together, or, in some cases, the world.

Probably the worst case of an Internet user abusing their rights would Lori Drew, a 47-year-old mother, who posed as a boy named “Josh Evans” to talk to a 13-year-old girl named Megan Meier. In 2006, Drew played a role in a six-week online friendship with Meier, eventually turning the conversations sour, ultimately making the comment, “the world would be better place without you” (qtd. in Keen). Meier, upon reading this, went up to her room, and hung herself. Calls were made for a criminal prosecution of Drew, but the St. Charles County Sheriff's Department never charged drew, saying her actions “might've been rude, it might've been immature, but it wasn't illegal” (qtd. in Keen). Andrew Keen in the Times Union of Albany New York poses the question, “What happens, for example, when anonymous Internet critics go beyond rude and irremediably blacken the reputations of innocent citizens or cause them harm? Should there be legal consequences” (n. pag)?

A CyberSLAPP suit is a case where a group of people, usually a business organization, attempts to sue a website for the personal information, names, IP addresses, and registration information of otherwise anonymous users, or to sue the anonymous users themselves. A SLAPP, or Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation, is usually filed by a large corporation against individual people. A website, run by the American Civil Liberties Union, the Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, and Public Citizen, dedicated to chronicling these court cases reads, "CyberSLAPP cases typically involve a person who has posted anonymous criticisms of a corporation or public figure on the Internet. The target of the criticism then files a frivolous lawsuit just so they can issue a subpoena to the Web site or Internet Service Provider (ISP) involved, discover the identity of their anonymous critic, and intimidate or silence them" (CyberSLAPP). A CyberSLAPP is seen by most critics as an abuse of the legal system as the corporation typically benefits not from winning the court case, but from filing the case in the first place. The individuals suffer from the costs of going to court, and by losing their anonymity. Anyone may file a court case, but some states have passed laws to deter companies from filing SLAPP cases, by requiring them to pay legal fees to the defendant if the case is found to be a SLAPP. CyberSLAPPs are just one of the many attacks on Internet anonymity.

Several attempts at banning anonymous speech over the internet have been made over the years. House Bill 775, filed by Tim Couch in Kentucky on March 3rd 2008, would ban anonymous blogging and messaging in Kentucky by requiring anyone who contributes to a Web site to register their real name, address, and email address, and display that name every time they posted. Tim Couch said “Some nasty things have been said about high school kids in my district, usually by other kids. The adults get in on it, too” (qtd. in Cheves). It's when the adults get in on things, is when problems start to form. Andrew Keen, writer for the Times Union writes “Today, too many anonymous Internet users are posting hateful content about their neighbors, classmates and co-workers; today, online media is an increasingly shadowy, vertiginous environment in which it is becoming harder and harder to know other people's real identities” (n. pag.). Tim Couch went on to say, "When you're anonymous, you can say anything you want to about someone and nobody knows who you are" (qtd. in Cheves). The bill would make web site operators that didn’t enforce such rules pay fines of up to $500 for the first offense and $1000 for every additional offense. Couch acknowledges that the bill violates first amendment rights, and says that he mostly filed the bill in order to turn the public's eye onto the issue (qtd. in Cheves).

Though not necessarily related to Internet anonymity, it is interesting to note that the Ku Klux Klan is denied the right to wear masks in public gatherings. The Omaha World Herald reports “Such a hateful doctrine as racial separation is bound to generate emotion from people who disagree. The idea itself has been supported by violence in the past” (More). One could easily make the comparison to Internet trolls. Trolls use their anonymity to insult and damage the reputation of other Internet users, often saying sexist and racist things, sometimes damaging enough to drive certain people to suicide. A case could be made to compare the two groups, either for, or against either side. The Omaha World Herald article went on to say, “Accordingly, showing one's face would be more likely to help keep the peace during a demonstration, at least on the part of the demonstrators. It holds them more accountable for their words and actions” (More on free speech: Why masks and hoods don't qualify as a protected form of anonymous communication). However, an opposing viewpoint could state that where the Ku Klux Klan is solely based on hatred, anonymity on the Internet has several positive aspects to it, such as the feeling of safety and community confessing secrets, without worry that any of your peers will read it. Punishing the entire Internet community for the actions of a select few individuals would be like taking automobiles off the streets because some people get into car accidents.

So far, court rulings have been consistent in ruling that anonymous speech is protected speech, regardless of how rude it may be. The much cited 1995 case, where “Mrs. McIntyre, a constant critic of fiscal practices in the Westerville, Ohio, school district, was fined $100 for passing out unsigned leaflets opposing a school tax increase” (Protecting Anonymous Speech). The Supreme Court granted McIntyre her victory shortly after her death, and the case has since been referenced in later court cases. Bills keep coming, from House Bill 775, to Senate Bill 154, or Senate Bill 92, there seems to be no end. The Supreme Court remains firm on the matter, however. The first amendment protects speech rather simply and plainly, and anonymous speech is clearly what the founding fathers would consider to be protected speech. The Rocky Mountain News points out that “Benjamin Franklin did it. James Madison did it. So did Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and a long list of other prominent Americans, both at the beginning of this nation and throughout much of its history. Why, even Abraham Lincoln resorted to publishing under a fictitious name - in other words, under the cloak of anonymity - when writing political commentary” (The Nameless). It's clear and obvious that an amendment to the constitution would be required for anonymity to ever be totally abolished.

Internet anonymity is privacy at its finest. Every case in history that has been made to say that Internet anonymity should be disallowed has been met with failure. Jonathan Wallace wrote, “Anonymous and pseudonymous speech on the Internet forms a part of the rich tradition of such speech in prior media, including print, and is entitled to the same First Amendment protections” (6). The director of the ACLU’s Washington Legislative Office, Caroline Fredrickson said that "Congress should act to protect the rights of all Internet users to send and receive lawful content free of censorship from government or business” (Congress Must Act to Keep the Internet Free From Censorship). Not only is anonymity protected by the First Amendment of the Constitution, it even helps to enforce the right to freedom of speech. If trends continue the way they are, Internet anonymity is free to stay.


WORKS CITED
Abelson, Reed. "By the Water Cooler in Cyberspace, the Talk Turns Ugly." New York Times 29 Apr. 2001. 21 Apr. 2008 <http://www.nytimes.com>.
Cheves, John. "Bill would ban anonymous Web comments." March 5 2008 Pol Watcher. 21 Apr. 2008 <http://polwatchers.typepad.com/pol_watchers/2008/03/bill-would-ban.html>.
"Congress Must Act to Keep the Internet Free From Censorship." ACLU. 11 Mar. 2008. ACLU. 23 Apr. 2008 <http://www.aclu.org/freespeech/internet/34436prs20080311.html>.
"CyberSLAPP.Org." CyberSLAPP. American Civil Liberties Union, the Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, Public Citizen. 29 Apr. 2008 <http://www.cyberslapp.org/>.
"D.C. Churches Begin Confession Ads." Associate Press 22 Feb. 2007. 22 Apr. 2008 <http://www.beliefnet.com/story/212/story_21273_1.html>.
Davenport, David. "Individuals Should Not Be Allowed to Communicate Anonymously Via the Internet." Current Controversies: Civil Liberties. Ed. James D. Torr. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2003. Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center. Gale. Santa Rosa Junior College Library. 23 Apr. 2008 <http://find.galegroup.com.proxy.www.santarosa.edu:2048>.
Donath, Judith S. "Identity and Deception in the Virtual Community." 12 November, 1996. MIT Media Lab. MIT Media Lab. 12 Nov. 1996. 21 Apr. 2008 <http://smg.media.mit.edu/people/Judith/Identity/IdentityDeception.html>.
"Don't Ban Anonymity ; The Issue: Another Attempt To Ban Anonymous Speech; Our View: It's A Tempting Idea, But Still Unwise : [Final Edition].” Rocky Mountain News  [Denver, Colo.] 6  Mar. 2002,38A.  ProQuest Newsstand. ProQuest.  Santa Rosa Junior College  23 Apr. 2008 <http://www.proquest.com.proxy.www.santarosa.edu:2048/>.
Herring, Susan, Kirk Job-Sluder, Rebecca Scheckler, and Sasha Barab. "Searching for Safety Online: Managing "Trolling" in a Feminist Forum." Indiana University. 30 Aug. 2005. Indiana University, Bloomington, School of Education. 21 Apr. 2008 <http://rkcsi.indiana.edu/>.
Keen, Andrew. "Just how vital is anonymous speech? " Times Union [Albany, N.Y.] 7 Mar. 2008,A.11. ProQuest Newsstand. ProQuest. Santa Rosa Junior College. 22 Apr. 2008 <http://www.proquest.com.proxy.www.santarosa.edu:2048/>.
Kentucky. General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. “House Bill 775”. By J. Higdon and Tim Couch. 21 Apr. 2008 Kentucky Legislature. <http://www.lrc.ky.gov/record/08RS/HB775/bill.doc>.
Machalinski, Anne. "Got a Confession to Make? Just Log on and Spill Your Guts to Strangers." Columbia News Service 1 Nov. 2005. 21 Apr. 2008 <http://jscms.jrn.columbia.edu/cns/2005-11-01/machalinski-cyberconfession>.
"More on free speech: Why masks and hoods don't qualify as a protected form of anonymous communication Iowa, Midlands, Nebraska, Sunrise Edition]." Omaha World - Herald [Omaha, Neb.] 11 Dec. 2004,08B. ProQuest Newsstand. ProQuest.  Santa Rosa Community College. 22 Apr. 2008 <http://www.proquest.com.proxy.www.santarosa.edu:2048/>.
Palme, Jacob, and Mikael Berglund. "Anonymity on the Internet." 30 July 2002. DSV - the Department of Computer and Systems Sciences at Stockholm University. Dsv.su.se/. 21 Apr. 2008 <http://people.dsv.su.se/~jpalme/society/anonymity.html >.
"Protecting Anonymous Speech."New York Times [New York, N.Y.] 24 Apr.1995, Late Edition (East Coast):A.16.Banking Information Source. ProQuest. Santa Rosa Junior College. 22 Apr. 2008 <http://www.proquest.com.proxy.www.santarosa.edu:2048/>
"The Nameless: Don't Try To Outlaw Anonymous Speech The Issue: Should We Ban Anonymous Speech?; Our View: Not If We Value The Bill Of Rights FINAL Edition]. " Rocky Mountain News [Denver, Colo.] 15 Apr. 2001,7D. ProQuest Newsstand. ProQuest. Santa Rosa Junior College. 22 Apr. 2008 <http://www.proquest.com.proxy.www.santarosa.edu:2048/>
"Trolling Definition." PC Mag Encyclopedia. 2008. 21 Apr. 2008 <http://www.pcmag.com>.
Wallace, Jonathan D. "Nameless in Cyberspace Anonymity on the Internet." CATO Briefing Papers 54 (1999): 1-8. 21 Apr. 2008 <http://www.cato.org/pubs/briefs/bp54.pdf>.
Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 22 Jul. 2004. Wikimedia Foundation. 10 Aug. 2004 <http://en.wikipedia.org>.
Elara

Divine Mamkute
Dark Elf Goddess
Chaos Imp
Penguins Fan

Ms. Invisable








Since: 08-15-04
From: Ferelden

Since last post: 12 days
Last activity: 12 days
Posted on 07-24-08 04:20 AM Link | Quote
While I despair that you have made another account and posted again, I must say that is a good essay, though you seem to take no strong stance.

I say that anonymity is a good thing on the internet... yes there are those that abuse it, but so much more good comes of it than bad. Besides, if there are teenagers out there killing themselves because of something said to them on MySpace then they had way bigger problems than talking to a person with a pseudonym.

avatar of law

Beezo








Since: 12-29-04
From: paris, canada

Since last post: 4372 days
Last activity: 4372 days
Posted on 07-26-08 03:35 PM Link | Quote
I would say that being unnamed is only good when you're asking personal questions, and not wanting people you know IRL to find out. Or to speak out politically. However, there are far too many people who have too much time on their hands. Many of these individuals/groups, whom we all know, and will go un-nammed, use it to find information on others and bully them. I have witnessed this while on a webcam chat on a big website. We were simply chatting, and her phone rings. Some Ex online friend called, made demands, and she was in tears. Some guy befriended a teenanger, got her information, and later used it to abuse the friendship.

It's too common that many of us older teenager, or adults know not to give out personal information to strangers. However, younger teens are out there trying to make sincere friendships. This group of bullies make it their job to pretend to be friends, and to be "Heroed." Hero-ed, is an act of getting a girl to flash, and posting it and bragging about it. If the girl no longer does it, he uses her private info, threatens to post it online and get her into trouble. If she resists, the group attacks with phone calls to the house, letters to their teacher, ect.

While being unknown is great for someone who is trying to make changes to policies, it hasn't been used for good, at least where i've been.
Xeios

You WANKER!








Since: 08-16-04

Since last post: 3679 days
Last activity: 1849 days
Posted on 07-27-08 02:35 AM Link | Quote
Wow.

Don't edit my posts when they do contribute.

For all those who missed it, I quoted Shadow several times then said "I rest My Case"

For 90% of his posts are exactly what internet anonymity does to people, and I had completely proven my point without having to say very much at all.


(Last edited by Soiex on 07-28-08 02:33 PM)
Lord Vulkas Mormonus

Vile
High Xeodent of Xeomerica.








Since: 10-29-04
From: North Carolina, United States. World, Sol System, milky way

Since last post: 1127 days
Last activity: 208 days
Posted on 07-27-08 10:46 PM Link | Quote
Personally, I think that having internet anonymity is good and important, but like all rights and priviledges, it will be abused by those who seek to cause harm.

But something to realize is, if someone is going to cause problems, they'll cause problems, a faceless mask behind the internet is just one way for them to do it.
Astrophel
Fear will kill your mind and steal your love as sure as anything;
Fear will rob you blind and make you numb to others suffering









Since: 10-03-04
From: Azul Lux Orbital, Kirin Beta

Since last post: 1085 days
Last activity: 433 days
Posted on 07-27-08 11:27 PM Link | Quote
Xeios, do take note of that edit. I'm trying to keep this forum free of any bullshit (including the "post consisting of nothing but a "clever" personal attack, whether the target is banned or not), and I don't want anyone - especially staff - undermining that.
Xeios

You WANKER!








Since: 08-16-04

Since last post: 3679 days
Last activity: 1849 days
Posted on 07-28-08 02:39 PM Link | Quote
Clever personal attack you say. I think that was exactly what your edit was, so keep to yourself next time, the web site is a big boy and can handle some shots at a member that has been nothing but a joke since his first ban eons ago. You should also learn a thing about what a "clever" personal attack consists of, mainly every time you editted his posts with the same thing, that counts as a "clever" (but not really) personal attack.

Originally posted by Thexare
Edit: Hi. Thexare here. Just letting you know that the grey name color means something - specifically, it means "fuck off, we don't want you here."


I rest my fucking case.
Astrophel
Fear will kill your mind and steal your love as sure as anything;
Fear will rob you blind and make you numb to others suffering









Since: 10-03-04
From: Azul Lux Orbital, Kirin Beta

Since last post: 1085 days
Last activity: 433 days
Posted on 07-28-08 03:02 PM Link | Quote
When someone's banned, "we don't want you here" is exactly what it means!


(Last edited by Thex on 07-28-08 03:02 PM)
Xeios

You WANKER!








Since: 08-16-04

Since last post: 3679 days
Last activity: 1849 days
Posted on 07-28-08 03:23 PM Link | Quote
Originally posted by thexare
If you're not a full moderator or admin, quit trying to argue with my decisions in Debate Shrine!


Very passive aggressive.
The Accidental Protege

Iggy Koopa
I\'m your accidental protege...
The gift, the blood, the thrownaway...\"










Since: 03-08-05
From: Marching on the city of Southern Cross

Since last post: 7 days
Last activity: 1 day
Posted on 07-28-08 05:05 PM Link | Quote
Knock it off, both of you. You should know better than that. And I don't care who's at fault in this little spat. Let's get back on topic, what say?
Kard Ayals
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Posted on 07-28-08 06:17 PM Link | Quote
I've got a ban hammer and I'm not afraid to use it!!

(p.s: knock it off guys, I'm serious)
Xeios

You WANKER!








Since: 08-16-04

Since last post: 3679 days
Last activity: 1849 days
Posted on 07-29-08 03:22 AM Link | Quote
I know, I know. I knocked it off. Antagonizing words were said through PM and I decided to be the bigger man and drop the whole thing.

So, internet anonymity is essentially the cause of almost all the problems online. Look at 4chan, that place is terrible and filled with the seedy underbelly of the internet, but it (every few years) produces a gem of comic gold.
True Flight

The One








Since: 08-21-04

Since last post: 1507 days
Last activity: 1492 days
Posted on 07-29-08 04:44 AM Link | Quote
first *cough* honesty box *cough*

second... it's fucking annoying. *nods*
Spartan

Metal battleaxe
Is back. Kind of.








Since: 11-15-04

Since last post: 934 days
Last activity: 175 days
Posted on 07-29-08 11:47 PM Link | Quote
*cough* I'm pretty sure Mark's fare from anonymous, Lets see probably half the board his has phone number, his aim and knows what city he lives in and who his friends are.
Cairoi
This isn't about you and your loud mouth,
This is about me and my fucking beard.








Since: 08-29-04
From: PA

Since last post: 3453 days
Last activity: 3077 days
Posted on 07-30-08 01:49 AM Link | Quote
That conversation ended, Spartan. Let's try and NOT bring it up again.

This is a general warning. The Mark argument is not to be touched upon again.
True Flight

The One








Since: 08-21-04

Since last post: 1507 days
Last activity: 1492 days
Posted on 07-30-08 01:59 AM Link | Quote
You know it's something that's a big hush hush here... just like what was his name... Uzumaki?

ANYWAY.... Internet Anonymity... annoying... makes me urk to see spam. But hey it's going to happen all the time. The only thing you can track is the ip address now a days.
Bitmap

#1 Enhancement Shaman US Ravenholdt








Since: 09-05-04
From: His Laughin' Place

Since last post: 3162 days
Last activity: 3155 days
Posted on 08-03-08 11:36 PM Link | Quote
Originally posted by Soiex
I know, I know. I knocked it off. Antagonizing words were said through PM and I decided to be the bigger man and drop the whole thing.

So, internet anonymity is essentially the cause of almost all the problems online. Look at 4chan, that place is terrible and filled with the seedy underbelly of the internet, but it (every few years) produces a gem of comic gold.


You have never been to the Something Awful forums have you? That place is a goldmine for funny crap. (Disregarding anonymity, do you know everyone there? In one way, they are anonymous if you think about it. I could be, but I am a little too open.)

4chan has always been garbage, and the site itself knows it, its even a meme for fucks sake.

Anonymity is just like getting a drivers license, its a privalage(sp?), not a right. Take a look at all the "Anonymous" bomb threats and so forth? Where is their precious Anonymity? Gone.


(Last edited by Nagis on 08-03-08 11:37 PM)
Ryan

Ptooie
Is back!









Since: 10-01-04
From: Stafford, UK

Since last post: 3249 days
Last activity: 3209 days
Posted on 08-05-08 12:58 PM Link | Quote
It'd be interesting to see a non-anonymous bomb threat...

"Dear Xeogaming HQ,

I am writing to you to inform you of three bombs planted by major weakpoints in your building's structure. They will detonate in an hour unless you send three million dollars to 4chan before that time.

Yours sincerely,

Ryan Whitehead, anonymous' P.A.
*Insert address here*"
Bitmap

#1 Enhancement Shaman US Ravenholdt








Since: 09-05-04
From: His Laughin' Place

Since last post: 3162 days
Last activity: 3155 days
Posted on 08-07-08 10:59 AM Link | Quote
Originally posted by Ryan
It'd be interesting to see a non-anonymous bomb threat...

"Dear Xeogaming HQ,

I am writing to you to inform you of three bombs planted by major weakpoints in your building's structure. They will detonate in an hour unless you send three million dollars to ebaumsworld before that time.

Yours sincerely,

Ryan Whitehead, anonymous' P.A.
*Insert address here*"


Fixed.
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